Frances Ridley Havergal Bibliography Generator

Author: Frances Ridley Havergal

Havergal, Frances Ridley, daughter of the Rev. W. H. Havergal, was born at Astley, Worcestershire, Dec. 14, 1836. Five years later her father removed to the Rectory of St. Nicholas, Worcester. In August, 1850, she entered Mrs. Teed's school, whose influence over her was most beneficial. In the following year she says, "I committed my soul to the Saviour, and earth and heaven seemed brighter from that moment." A short sojourn in Germany followed, and on her return she was confirmed in Worcester Cathedral, July 17, 1853. In 1860 she left Worcester on her father resigning the Rectory of St. Nicholas, and resided at different periods in Leamington, and at Caswall Bay, Swansea, broken by visits to Switzerland, Scotland, and North Wales. She died… Go to person page >

Notes

Scripture References: all st. = Isa. 6:8, Phil. 1:20-21, Rom. 12:1 st. 4 = Luke 21:2-3 (KJV) Frances R. Havergal (b. Astley, Worcestershire, England, 1836; d. Oystermouth, Glamorganshire, Wales, 1879) originally composed her text in eleven couplets as a hymn of "self-consecration to Christ" on February 4, 1874. She told the following story about writing this hymn:

I went for a little visit of five days [to Areley House, Worcestershire, in December 1873]. There were ten persons in the house, some unconverted and long prayed for, some converted but not rejoicing Christians. [God] gave me the prayer, "Lord, give me all this house." And He just did! Before I left the house, everyone had got a blessing. The last night of my visit. . . I was too happy to sleep and passed most of the night in praise and renewal of my own consecration, and these little couplets formed themselves and chimed in my heart, one after another, till they finished with "Ever, only, all, for Thee."
The text is a "catalog" hymn that lists aspects of our lives and offers them in Christ's service. "Take My Life and Let It Be" was first published in the 1874 appendix to Charles B. Snepp's Songs of Grace and Glory (1872). A twelfth couplet was added at some later point, producing the six stanzas published in the Psalter Hymnal. Although her formal education was sporadic because of poor health, Havergal learned six foreign languages, including Greek and Hebrew, and was well read in many subjects. She began writing poetry at an early age and was also an accomplished singer and pianist. The daughter of a clergyman, she had a conversion experience at the age of fourteen and was confirmed in the Church of England in 1853. Taking seriously her own words "take my silver and my gold," she sent all her jewelry to the Church Mission Society to be sold. She also supported other charitable organizations. Her more than one hundred hymns were originally published in leaflets and later gathered into seven collections: Ministry of Song (1869), Twelve Sacred Songs for Little Singers (1870), Under the Surface (1874), Loyal Responses (1878), Life Mosaic (1879), Life Chords (1880), and Life Echoes (1883), as well as in one large volume, Poetical Works (1884). Liturgical Use: Christian worship that emphasizes dedication, offering, or commitment-for example, after the sermon, as an offertory hymn, for ordination or commissioning, for profession of faith, for the dedication or anniversary of a church or congregation; fits well with many stewardship themes. --Psalter Hymnal Handbook ============================ Take my life, and let it be. Frances R. Havergal. [Self-Consecration to Christ.] This hymn was written at Areley House, Feb. 4, 1874, in 11 stanzas of 2 lines, and published in her Loyal Responses, 1878; the musical edition of the same, 1881; and in Life Chords, 1880. It has also been printed as a leaflet, in various forms for Confirmation, Self-Consecration, and for enclosing in letters, some being accompanied by her father's tune Patmos. It has been translated into French, German, Swedish, Russian, and other European languages, and into several of those of Africa and Asia. The history of its origin is thus given in the HAV. Manuscript:—
Perhaps you will be interested to know the origin of the consecration hymn 'Take my life.' I went for a little visit of five days [to Areley House]. There were ten persons in the house, some unconverted and long prayed for, some converted, but not rejoicing Christians. He gave me the prayer 'Lord, give me all in this house!' And He just did! Before I left the house every one had got a blessing. The last night of my visit after I had retired, the governess asked me to go to the two daughters. They were crying, &c.; then and there both of them trusted and rejoiced; it was nearly midnight. I was too happy to sleep, and passed most of the night in praise and renewal of my own consecration; and these little couplets formed themselves, and chimed in my heart one after another till they finished with 'Ever, Only, ALL for Thee!'"
The music to which Miss Havergal invariably sang this hymn, and with which it was always associated in the publications over which she had any influence, was her father's tune Patmos, and the family's desire is that this course may be followed by others. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

For Leaders

Here is how author Frances Havergal describes the events that inspired the writing of this hymn:

“I went for a little visit of five days. There were ten persons in the house, some unconverted and long prayed for; some converted, but not rejoicing Christians. He gave me the prayer: ‘Lord, give me all in this house.’ And He just DID! Before I left the house everyone had got a blessing. The last night of my visit, after I had retired, the governess asked me to go to the two daughters. They were crying, etc. Then and there both of them trusted and rejoiced. It was nearly midnight. I was too happy to sleep, and passed most of the night in praise and renewal of my own consecration; and these little couplets formed themselves and chimed in my heart one after another till they finished with ‘ever, only, all for Thee’” (Lutheran Hymnal Handbook, 486).

This hymn is a beautiful prayer that God would both draw us closer to Himself, and use us to bring others to Him. God calls us to a life of discipleship, and our only response should be, “Here am I. Send me.”

Text:

Critics have raved over Havergal’s text for almost two centuries. Hymn author Ira Sankey wrote that this was “one of the finest consecration hymns in the world” (Sankey, My Life in Hymns, 81). Albert Bailey wrote, “This hymn has had a career of great usefulness. It has frequently objectified for even young children what practical ways of serving Christ may be theirs in their every-day lives” (Bailey, The Gospel in Hymns, 405).

Each verse offers a different part of ourselves for the purposes of God – our life, our hands, our voice, our money, our wills, and our love. Modern hymnals include a number of different arrangements of the text. For example, the Psalter Hymnal ends verse one with “Take my moments and my days; let them flow in endless praise” and begins the second verse with “Take my hands and let them move at the impulse of thy love.” The Worshiping Church uses the latter line to end the first verse, and doesn’t include the former line in any verse. Modern hymnals include anywhere from four to six verses.

Tune:

Originally Havergal’s text was set to the tune PATMOS which was composed by her father, William H. Havergal, in 1847. Frances was apparently quite adamant that this be the only tune her text was sung to, but this was not to be the case. Henri A. Cesar Malan composed the tune HENDON around 1827. It was taken over to North America by Lowell Mason where it quickly became the tune associated with this hymn, and is found in most modern hymnals.

This is a gentle, quiet tune that doesn’t require much accompaniment. Use guitar picking or light piano with a flute or violin providing harmony lines, or a very light organ registration. On the third verse, which reads, “Take my voice and let me sing always, only for my King,” consider dropping out instrumentally so only the voices are heard.

Chris Tomlin and Louie Giglio have altered the melody a bit and added a chorus that echoes the text of Isa. 6:8, which says, “’Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?’ And I said, ‘Here am I. Send me!’” Tomlin’s chorus reads, “Here am I, all of me, take my life, it’s all for thee.” In this version, keep the verses softer and grow on the chorus, which you can repeat multiple times, getting louder as you repeat. The strength and volume of the chorus makes this a perfect alternative to the original for a large praise band with drums and electric guitar.

When/Why/How:

This hymn can be sung in any time of worship that emphasizes our dedication of our whole selves to God, or our commitment to serve God. Consider transitioning right into the simple song “Take, o Take Me As I Am” at the end, or pairing the hymn with “Be Thou My Vision.”

Suggested music:

Laura de Jong,
Hymnary.org

FlexScores are available in the Media section below.

MuseScore is a free music notation program that can open and edit MusicXML scores.

Instances

Ambassador Hymnal: for Lutheran worship #453Take My Life and Let It BeTake my life, and let it bePATMOSFrances R. Havergal, 1836-187977 771994Discipleship | ; Obedience | ; Service | ; Surrender |
An Nou Chanté! : Let's Sing! #36Take my life, and let it be (Pran lavim, Ségnè Jézu)Take my life, and let it be (Pran lavim, Ségnè Jézu)[Take my life, and let it be (Pran lavim, Ségnè Jézu)]Frances Ridley Havergal, 1836-791979
Ancient and Modern: hymns and songs for refreshing worship #787aTake my life, and let it beTake my life, and let it beNOTTINGHAMFrances Ridley Havergal (1836-1879)77 77Mark 12:41-44; 1 Corinthians 6:19-20; Ephesians 4:282013Commitment | ; Dedication | of people; Devotion | ; Discipleship | ; Proper 23 | Year B; Proper 8 | Year B; Self-offering | ; Stewardship | ; The Fourth Sunday before Lent | Year A; Vocation | ; Christian Initiation |
Ancient and Modern: hymns and songs for refreshing worship #787bTake my life, and let it beTake my life, and let it beST BEESFrances Ridley Havergal (1836-1879)77 77Mark 12:41-44; 1 Corinthians 6:19-20; Ephesians 4:282013Commitment | ; Dedication | of people; Devotion | ; Discipleship | ; Proper 23 | Year B; Proper 8 | Year B; Self-offering | ; Stewardship | ; The Fourth Sunday before Lent | Year A; Vocation | ; Christian Initiation |
Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #687Take my life, and let it beTake my life, and let it beNOTTINGHAMFrancis R. Havergal2008
Baptist Hymnal 1991 #277Take My Life, and Let It Be ConsecratedTake my life, and let it beHENDONFrances R. Havergal7.7.7.7.7.Romans 12:11991
Baptist Hymnal 1991 #283Take My Life, and Let It Be ConsecratedTake my life, and let it beYARBROUGHFrances R. Havergal7.7.7.7. with RefrainRomans 12:11991
Baptist Hymnal 2008 #534Take My Life, and Let It Be ConsecratedTake my life, and let it beHENDONFrances R. Havergal7.7.7.7.7.2008Commitment, Dedication, Consecration, Devotion | ; Prayer, Petition |
Baptist Hymnal 2008 #541Take My Life, and Let It Be Consecrated Take my life, and let it beYARBROUGHFrances R. Havergal7.7.7.7. with Chorus2008Commitment, Dedication, Consecration, Devotion | ; Prayer, Petition |
Celebrating Grace Hymnal #490Take My Life, and Let It Be ConsecratedTake my life, and let it beHENDONFrances R. Havergal7.7.7.72010The Church at Worship | Commitment; Commitment | ; Discipleship |
Chalice Hymnal #609Take My Life, and Let It BeTake my life, and let it beHENDONFrances R. Havergal77.77.71995Life of Discipleship | Loyalty and Courage; God's Church | Life of Discipleship: Loyalty and Courage; Acceptance of Christ | ; Commitment | ; Courage | ; Discipleship | ; Love |
Christian Worship: a Lutheran hymnal #469Take My Life and Let It BeTake my life and let it bePATMOSFrances R. Havergal, 1836-7977 771993Commitment |
Church Family Worship #151Take my life, and let it beTake my life, and let it be77 771988
Church Hymnal, Fifth Edition #597Take my life, and let it beTake my life, and let it be2000
Church Hymnary (4th ed.) #502Take my life, Lord, let it beTake my life, Lord, let it beNOTTINGHAMFrances Ridley Havergal (1836-1879)77 771 Corinthians 6:19-20; Isaiah 52:7; John 17:17-19; Luke 9:23; Mark 12:41-44; Matthew 19:16-30; Matthew 26:39; Psalm 34:1; Romans 6:13; Romans 12:1-22005Our Response to Christ | In Dedication; Offering | of self
Common Praise (1998) #435Take My Life, and Let It BeTake my life, and let it beMOZARTFrances Ridley Havergal (1836-1879)77 77Isaiah 6:1-8; 4 Maccabees 13:13-16; Luke 1:26-38; Luke 7:36 - 8:3; Luke 21:1-4; John 6:1-21; Philippians 1:12-30; Philippians 3:4-161998Call and Vocation | ; Discipleship | ; Offertory | ; Stewardship |
Common Praise: A new edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern #581aTake my life, and let it beTake my life, and let it beST BEESFrances Ridley Havergal, 1836-187977 77Acts 4:34-37; Acts 5:2; Acts 27:23; Daniel 1:8; Exodus 25:2; Ezekiel 3:1-4; Jeremiah 1:9; Luke 21:1-4; Malachi 3:8-10; Nahum 1:15; Psalm 45:1; Romans 6:13; Romans 6:19; Romans 10:14-15; Romans 12:1; Zechariah 2:82000Fourth Sunday Before Lent | Year A; Lent III | Year B; Proper 8 | Year A; Proper 20 | Year A; Third Sunday Before Advent | Year B; Baptism and Confirmation |
Common Praise: A new edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern #581bTake my life, and let it beTake my life, and let it beNOTTINGHAMFrances Ridley Havergal, 1836-187977 77Acts 4:34-37; Acts 5:2; Acts 27:23; Daniel 1:8; Exodus 25:2; Ezekiel 3:1-4; Jeremiah 1:9; Luke 21:1-4; Malachi 3:8-10; Nahum 1:15; Psalm 45:1; Romans 6:13; Romans 6:19; Romans 10:14-15; Romans 12:1; Zechariah 2:82000Fourth Sunday Before Lent | Year A; Lent III | Year B; Proper 8 | Year A; Proper 20 | Year A; Third Sunday Before Advent | Year B; Baptism and Confirmation |
Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #625aTake my life, and let it beTake my life, and let it beINNOCENTSFrances Ridley Havergal, 1836-187977 772000Faith, Trust and Commitment | ; Offertory Hymn | ; Year C | Proper 18
Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #625bTake my life, and let it beTake my life, and let it beNOTTINGHAMFrances Ridley Havergal, 1836-187977 772000Faith, Trust and Commitment | ; Offertory Hymn | ; Year C | Proper 18

Biography

Source: hymntime.com/tch

Frances Ridley Havergal (December 14, 1836 – June 3, 1879) was an English religious poet and hymn writer. Take My Life and Let it Be and Thy Life for Me (also known as I Gave My Life for Thee) are two of her best known hymns. She also wrote hymn melodies, religious tracts, and works for children.

She was born into an Anglican family, at Astley in Worcestershire. Her father, William Henry Havergal (1793–1870), was a clergyman, writer, composer, and hymnwriter. Her brother, Henry East Havergal, was a priest in the Church of England and an organist. In 1852/3 she studied in the Louisenschule, Düsseldorf, and at Oberkassel. Otherwise she led a quiet life, not enjoying consistent good health; she travelled, in particular to Switzerland. She supported the Church Missionary Society.

She died of peritonitis at Caswell Bay on the Gower Peninsula in Wales at age 42. Her sisters saw much of her work published posthumously. Havergal College, a private girls' school in Toronto, is named after her. The composer Havergal Brian adopted the name as a tribute to the Havergal family.

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